Dreamcricket USA News

ICC Full Council to consider USACA's expulsion in June

2017 May 01 by DreamCricket USA

ICC Chief Executive David Richardson said: “The decision to pass this resolution was not taken lightly by the ICC Board. Our focus throughout this two year process has been on the unification of the USA cricket community behind USACA to grow and develop the sport. But it has become clear that this is just not possible and, having invested so much time and resources into helping USACA and with little in the way of cooperation from USACA, the ICC Board now felt that the only remaining option was for the ICC Full Council to consider expulsion of USACA as a member of the ICC."

A resolution regarding the expulsion of USACA from membership of the International Cricket Council (ICC) is expected to be considered by the ICC's Full Council in June of 2017, ICC wrote in a media release today.  USACA will remain suspended until then, the ICC noted.

The ICC Board's decision follows a consultative process seeking to unify the fractured cricket community in the USA.  USACA was suspended from ICC membership in 2015 - the organization's third suspension over the last 12 years.   The organization was previously suspended in 2005 and 2007 but was reinstated each time.   At the time of the last suspension in June 26, 2015, the ICC Chairman noted: "The ICC Board had put USACA on notice in its January meeting this year and had hoped that it would show some urgency to address and improve in the areas that were identified as weaknesses. Unfortunately, the response to date has been inadequate and it has proved necessary for the ICC Board to take further action.”  

The ICC held hundreds of meetings with cricket's stakeholders over the last two years and implemented programs to ensure that players did not suffer the consequences of the suspension.

In order to have its membership reinstated, USACA was required to demonstrate to the satisfaction of the ICC Board, that over three dozen conditions relating to governance, finance and its cricket activities have been addressed and remedied in full.  In a letter to the ICC dated April 20, 2017, USACA noted that it had approved a new constitution and "has now satisfied all the reinstatement conditions imposed for the ICC."  It was not publicly dislosed how the remaining 38 conditions were addressed but USACA claimed in its letter that the ICC's CEO Dave Richardson had told the USACA Board that "[T]he main point that is outstanding now is the constitution. [T]his is probably the key."

The ICC had already reviewed and objected to the provisions of the USACA constitution that was subsequently approved "neary unanimously" by USACA's members at a meeting of the USACA Board on April 8, 2017.   Some three weeks prior to the meeting of the USACA Board, the ICC pronounced clearly, and in no uncertain terms, that the proposed revised constitution did not incorporate all of the requirements laid down by the ICC Board and does not therefore fully satisfy one of the express conditions of membership reinstatement previously imposed by the ICC.   

USACA disregarded the ICC communication.  Instead, USACA wrote in its letter that the ICC's condition that a new election be conducted by a committee that was independent of the USACA Board violated New York Law.   USACA also found fault with ICC's insistence that the Chairperson be an independent director.   USACA said that such a rule meant that the ICC did not trust the USA cricket community to govern itself.   USACA also expressed its view that ICC's expectation regarding developing membership among individuals was unreasonable.  The reason USACA offered was puzzling -  "many in the US cricket community are today not free to declare themselves publicly as USACA members because of the current, hostile political situation facing persons not born [in the U.S.]." 

Following a meeting of the ICC Board last week, the ICC noted in its press release that it does not believe USACA genuinely exercises authority over the sport in the USA and that it instead, for a variety of reasons, presides over a severely fractured community with only a small number of cricket leagues subscribing to its membership.   ICC continues to be right in this regard.  USACA's latest membership validates ICC's claim.  In the Atlantic Region alone, two large leagues - Cricket League of New Jersey and Millennium Cricket League -  are missing from USACA's membership.   Cutting across to the American west, missing from the list is the Southern California Cricket Association - the largest league in the Los Angeles region.  Across the American landscape, many leagues have similarly declined to be represented by USACA.

Noting that cricket has been fractured in the USA for some considerable time, the ICC Board observed: "As such, the ICC made significant efforts to engage with the entire USA cricket community to try to identify what changes would be required to USACA’s governance structure to build a sustainable foundation."  ICC noted that for a considerable period of time the USACA board (and its nominee) failed to engage at all with the SFAG process.

ICC also noted that the alternative constitution that USACA sent to its membership included proposals that the ICC Board had specifically rejected as well as other material changes that had not been approved by the ICC Board. 

ICC Chief Executive David Richardson said: “The decision to pass this resolution was not taken lightly by the ICC Board. Our focus throughout this two year process has been on the unification of the USA cricket community behind USACA to grow and develop the sport. But it has become clear that this is just not possible and, having invested so much time and resources into helping USACA and with little in the way of cooperation from USACA, the ICC Board now felt that the only remaining option was for the ICC Full Council to consider expulsion of USACA as a member of the ICC."

“USACA’s refusal to engage in the process, to meet a number of fundamental reinstatement conditions, to provide responses to further requests for information and its apparent failure to put the ICC Board-approved constitution before its members without legitimate excuse undermines the all-important objective of uniting the sport.”