USA Cricket News

Over 5,500 Individual Voters, 22 Leagues and 150 Clubs Eligible To Vote In The 2018 Election

2018 May 08 by DreamCricket USA

USA Cricket published the lists of voting-eligible leagues, clubs and individual members on May 5th.  A quick back of the envelope calculation revealed that over 5,500 individual cricketers and administrators will be eligible to vote making it the largest cricket election the country has witnessed in the modern era.  

USA Cricket published the lists of voting-eligible leagues, clubs and individual members on May 5th.  A quick back of the envelope calculation revealed that over 5,500 individual cricketers and administrators will be eligible to vote making it the largest cricket election the country has witnessed in the modern era.  The roughly 5,500 individual voters will elect three individual directors when the election commence May 18th.

In addition to the individual voters, the organization announced that some 150 clubs were deemed vote-eligible.   These clubs will vote for the sole club director spot.   Also eligible to vote are 22 leagues, which will elect a league director.

When you scan the lists, it is clear that while mobilization of voters was intense in some parts of the country, many leagues on the east coast had not yet woken up from their winter hibernation and disregarded the timeline for the upcoming election.  

That the Commonwealth Cricket League is the largest league on the East Coast is an undisupted fact.  However, only five of its clubs successfully mobilized the threshold number of cricketers required to grant them voting eligibility.  It is also telling that only two leagues met the criteria for voting eligibility in New York.  

In the neighboring states of New Jersey and Connecticut, which are home to some of the largest and oldest cricket leagues in the US, the hardball cricket leagues were humbled in the mobilization of voters by the area's largest softball league, which rang in 15 voting-eligible clubs.  

In fact, the hardball leagues in Central Connecticut and Southern Connecticut found themselves with neither a league nor a club vote this election.   In New Jersey, the Millennium Cricket League drew a blank while the Cricket League of New Jersey just scraped past the threshold by registering four clubs.  

The leagues that held most clout in elections past, such as Washington Cricket League and Garden State Cricket League similarly drew a blank in the league and club category.   84 individuals registered from the Washington Cricket League and three cricketers turned out to register from the Garden State Cricket League.  League administrators that DreamCricket spoke to blamed the poor turnout on winter and pre-season hibernation, overall apathy and the absence of a champion for mobilization efforts.  At most of the leagues that had a large number of registrations, there was an evangelist who tirelessly drove the members to register.

Although well within the rules, such enthusiastic mobilization yielded whimsical results in some parts.  For example, Missouri will have an oversized voting representation for league votes.  The American Cricket Academy registered three different leagues - one each for men's hard ball, women's cricket and tennis ball cricket, giving it three league votes.   As noted above, when viewed in the context of how large 50-club leagues struggled to get even three of their teams registered, it is pleasantly surprising and mildly amusing to see Missouri's success.   A few hundred miles north, Midwest Cricket Conference was the leader in every category by registering most clubs (25) and individuals (468), assuring it great influence in deciding cricket's future.

Largely because of Midwest Cricket Confrence's efforts, Central Region led the pack with 54 club votes and 990 individual votes.  And thanks in no small part to ACAC's zealous registration, that region now also has 7 league votes making it a force to reckon with and shifting the electoral balance in its favor.   The West, with 47 club votes, 9 league votes and 973 individual voters came in a close second. The East, with just 32 club votes, 5 league votes and 521 individual voters will have to reconcile with a vastly diminished influence.  Just in case you were curious, many former league and individual members of USACA and USACA board, many of whom came from the East, are completely missing from the lists.  They simply haven't registered.

In the international player category, just 20 women and 37 men who played for the U.S. registered, showing that apathy was not confined to the recreational class.  With two player representatives on the board, this elite group will have an outsized influence on the proceedings.